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I've thought that Oklahoma should have "The OKC". This was an interesting event, but doesn't address the core concern: until polygamists can demonstrate that they're not a bunch of secluded crazies, polygamy will not be legalized. The problem is that right now, the shoe fits for many polygamists, and doubly so for the examples out there in the media.

Not to beat a dead horse, but it looks like the Church's PR campaign against the term 'Mormon fundamentalists' is having some success. Near the end, the article calls them 'those who call themselves fundamentalist Mormons.'

I agree, Dave, that the teenagers aren't acting like normal teenagers; but then again they are living a life that is vilified by an entire nation. So perhaps we could cut them some slack. And, besides, it's not like they all just burst out spontaneously singing songs with lyrics that defend their way of life; they are at a rally for that purpose. Doesn't sound much stranger than singing 'True to the Faith' as the opening hymn at a youth conference.

I didn't come here today to ask for your permission to live my beliefs. I shouldn't have to.

Amen to that! I totally agree with this statement.

The SLC

Now that's funny. I was thinking of "Salt Lake City, 84101."

Live and let live, man.

The rally was awesome! You don't know this, but two of the 17-year-olds who spoke have already started college. Diversity was reflected even among the teen speakers, who represented four separate communities/segments of the polygamous culture in Utah. Some of the teens girls were dressed in jeans with modern hair styles, and some were in dresses. One of the boys had a hairstyle that could have been taken from a music video on MTV. There were two rock bands that played music they wrote themselves. Some very good looking and talented youth!

For additional information, go to Principle Voices , which organized the event for the teens.

How would a belief in polygamy change your dating practices?

Is it OK to have multiple girlfriends, for example?

I think simple statistics will keep polygamy from preponderance in eternity. I do not imagine it being restored any time in the near future unless there is some unusual exigency.

I think these folks are wrong as to matters of religion, but I think it is unseemly to criticize them too harshly. It is like going to a foreign country and criticizing the culture without a deep and personal familiarity with its strengths and weaknesses.

The most interesting part of this rally is the appearance of a much broader spectrum of polygamists than typically makes the network news. They didn't look like they walked out of 1850, for example. The one young woman I heard on the news sounded very sincere.

Seth, what a strange question from a Latter-day Saint.

Amen, Ronan.

Seeing that sign "I love all my moms" made me realize I don't understand what the day-to-day life in a polygamous household looks like. Are we to understand that a child whose dad has three wives considers all three of those wives to be his or her mother and not just the wife who is actually the biological mother? I would have thought the latter. One reason is because some of my own ancestors were polygamists in the nineteenth century. Take the Richards. There are many many Richards around who all are descended from the same male progenitor, Franklin D. Richards because of polygamy. To my knowledge, however, the biological relationship is all that matters now. Thus, I do not consider Richards' other wives my great-great-great-grandmothers but rather only his wife who was my biological progenitor. This is only common sense. I don't even really know who Richards' other wives were, although a tiny research effort could show me that; but I don't really care all that much. Because this has been common sense for me my whole life, I never considered the notion that a child in a polygamous household right now might consider all his or her father's wives to be "moms" to him or her.

What we got here is that there were a lot of younger children as well, like ten year olds. I don't think those kids have a clue what they believe.

Comment No. 9 by: Jared E. said: |

If a child was adopted by a family, wouldn't he call his adopted mother and father "mom and dad"? and his adopted siblings would be his "brothers and sisters," wouldn't they? To me, this seems like the same issue. Living with multiple "mothers," I believe that you would feel a love and a spiritual link to all of them.

These kids are totally normal. Peaceably protesting is a constitutional right, and there are kids protesting right alongside their parents all the time, it's not uncommon.

How many 17-year-old kids do we really know to be able to say these kids were acting outside of that standard? Our rosy overlay does not seem to allow well spoken and well versed youth. Go to any high school and you'll find everything from a silent goth type to a jock to a bubbly cheerleader.

I was at an Eagle Scout service project Saturday and spoke with a 15-year-old girl who has a Catholic mom, agnostic LDS backround dad but goes to a fundamental born-again christian high school. She was complaining that her bible teacher was such a jerk (very 15-year-old) because of the poor grades on her two big papers.

He said her prayer was incomplete and that she was not giving her testimony in real terms. Her comment was this "how can he know that every prayer has to have confession, acknowledgement, gratitude when sometimes I just need help. And how could he possibly know if my testimony was real or not, not everyone has visions or perfect knowledge." Her comments were from a very opinionated but well spoken young girl who certainly was not quoting from a script.

I am one who believes that some of the youth today are very informed and articulate. The media bias against polygamists is odd when one looks at the liberal family, relationship and orientation bias prevalent in our society. I guess titillating stories tied to a religous sect is bad but pornographic movies of multiple partners simultaneously is to be embraced?

They hide in plain sight their sardonic hypocrisy and double standards.

Is it OK to have multiple girlfriends,

Seth, been there done that. One at Weber, one at USU. Worked out great until a third one entered the equation, then I had to do something about it. But I am by no means a polygamist. I just dated that way a couple of times, albeit incognito.

Tea,

You rascal you.

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