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Just like we have DINOs (Democrats In Name Only) and RINOs (Republicans etc.) I like the term MINOs for people who are still on the records but don't follow the behavioral commandments and don't go to church.

Priesthood holder is one.

Tithe payer is another.

I believe in Christ. That's what kind of Mormon I am. :)

Jewish Mormons are orthodox. Catholic Mormons are devout. Protestant Mormons are committed. It all depends where you're coming from.

What did the papers call Mitt Romney? My bet is devout b/c his family were colonistas, which put them geographically close to a lot of Catholics AND he served his mission in France, which is also close to a lot of Catholics.

I've also seen the term "practicing Mormon" in newspaper accounts; it correlates well to what we mean by "active."

I'd describe myself as a "social Mormon". I attend Sunday services and most other services, serve in callings when asked, pay my tithing but choose not to hold a temple recommend.

Dave,

You raise a good question, thanks for bringing this up. I have often struggled with how (practicing) Mormons categorize other Mormons based on their various levels of participation in the church (though I guess I do see why it happens). Quite often people who don't practice Mormonism any longer, such as LDS intellectuals for example, still identify themselves as Mormons. However, as already noted, someone from their ward would label them as less-active, an ex-Mormon, etc. This is a classification system that seems to be part of human nature, that people need to know how to act and react to certain people, so I guess I understand that component.

However, I always see this as troubling, or at least I think it’s hard from this ‘less-active’ person’s perspective. I often see the Jewish example in history. Jews still refer to each other as Jews, identify themselves as being Jewish, regardless of their level of commitment to the faith. (this is generally speaking). It would be great if Mormonism could adopt an aspect of this. That said, I do think many LDS intellectuals who don’t practice have already done this (provided they want to still identify as LDS), but practicing Mormons as a whole have still not reached this point. I would be great if Mormons could realize that being Mormon is more than just going through the motions of attending church, reading the BOM, etc., but that being a Mormon also has a mental or emotional component. But then again, that seems to be part of the Mormon worldview.

In closing, I think more could be said on this, but I think this statement briefly encapsulates my idea. I would welcome other thoughts on this also, perhaps others than can add to or improve this idea. And thanks again Dave for an insightful and discussion provoking topic and view into the Mormon world.

Interestingly enough, the first place I ran into the term "temple Mormon" was in an anti-Mormon publication I saw as a missionary. (I think it was the book The Godmakers, but I could be misremembering.) As I recall, it was used to suggest that an ex-member had been high up in the Church, so it wasn't really a correct usage.

Zach, I think you make a really good point about keeping the name while losing the practice. I wonder if Mormonism is still new enough (versus Judaism and Catholicism, for example) that lots of Mormons in name only don't even self-identify as Mormons (as was suggested above). Given this, for most people outside the Church, the only needed label is "Mormon" since most non-practicing members don't call themselves Mormons. I guess what I'm saying is that we might need a larger community of people who still use the label but don't associate with the Church as an institution before labels like "practicing" or "devout" Mormon will be all that needed.

"In good standing" might be a useful descriptor in some cases.

However, I always see this as troubling, or at least I think it’s hard from this ‘less-active’ person’s perspective. I often see the Jewish example in history. Jews still refer to each other as Jews, identify themselves as being Jewish, regardless of their level of commitment to the faith. (this is generally speaking). It would be great if Mormonism could adopt an aspect of this.

And if Mormonism ever becomes more of a hereditary cultural signifier than a deliberate choice of faith and devotion, I'm sure you'll see it. And something of infinitely higher value will have been lost.

For you theological astute Mormons, I have a research question. The NT states:

For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.
- 1 Corinthians 1:18

Are there any similar passages in Mormon texts

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